How one problem leads to another – and how Windows Vista helps you solve problems



December 23rd, 2007

Earlier this evening we were using one Windows Vista system to go through some media (photos and videos) stored on another Vista system when bang, we were hit by a crash.  We didn't catch the crash but with did catch the aftermath of it using the Problem Reports and Solutions in Vista's Control Panel.

How one problem leads to another - and how Windows Vista helps you solve problems

How one problem leads to another - and how Windows Vista helps you solve problems

Now here's the odd thing - we don't have, nor have we ever had, any Symantec products installed on either of these systems.  This led us to the conclusion that the whole "Run the Norton AntiVirus/Symantec AntiVirus (SAVRT.sys) tool" stuff was bogus and leading us down into a dead end.  Lesson #1 - Don't believe everything Microsoft tells you.

OK, not satisfied with that, we logged onto the system on which the media files were kept and discovered that that system too had suffered a crash at the same time - the exact same time according to Event Viewer. 

How one problem leads to another - and how Windows Vista helps you solve problems

How one problem leads to another - and how Windows Vista helps you solve problems

Coincidence?  Unlikely.  Lesson #2 - Problems that happen together are likely to be linked.

Now this write-up in Problem Reports and Solutions also sounded bogus initially - we couldn't think of any Intel Viiv/HP codecs installed on the system.  However, since the write-up included two file names to look for, we could at least do a search to rule them out.  Interestingly, a search revealed that the system did indeed have lmpgspl.ax installed.  Hmmm.  Now we're onto something.

We unregistered the file as suggested (right-clicked on Command Prompt and chose Run as administrator and then typed regsrv32 /u lmpgspl.ax and then hit ENTER) and tried to recreate the problem - we couldn't, so it's problem solved.  Just to check, we re-registered the file (right-clicked on Command Prompt and chose Run as administrator and then typed regsrv32 lmpgspl.ax and then hit ENTER) and could easily recreate the problem.  Lesson #3 - When troubleshooting, Problem Reports and Solutions can be helpful.

It seemed that the offending file had been installed by a program called Audio Cleanup Lab by Magix.  There's probably an updated lmpgspl.ax file available somewhere but it's getting late, so that can wait for another day.

 

This entry was posted on Sunday, December 23rd, 2007 at 00:20 and is filed under PC Doctor Tips. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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